How Much Do Electricians Earn Annually?

Electricians install and maintain the electrical wiring in homes and commercial buildings. Electricians may specialise in installing new systems into buildings and homes or maintain equipment and electrical systems. An electrician may work for a company, a private electrician business or be self-employed. The average salary for an electrician is between £20,173 and £34,032 per year, according to PayScale, as of December 2010.

Type of Employer

Self-employed electricians earn the highest salaries in the business with an average range between £18,838 and £40,355 annually, while those working for a state or local government earn a salary range between £19,793 and £31,750, according to PayScale. Electricians working for a company or a private electrician services firm earn salaries up to £39,677.

Location

The salary for electricians varies by state due to cost of living differences and demand for workers. For example, the salary for electricians in New York is between £20,007 and £41,516 and those in Tennessee earn salaries between £19,161 and £39,000, as of December 2010. The cost of living in New York is 51.3 per cent higher than in Memphis, Tennessee, according to My Salary.

Experience

Experienced electricians earn higher salaries than those just entering the field. An experienced professional with 20 years experience in the business can earn salaries between £27,008 and £47,005, while those with one to four years experience earn salaries between £18,116 and £32,058, according to PayScale. Experienced electricians gain a reputation for excellent work, which allows the professional to command a higher salary in the field.

Benefits

Companies and private electrician firms offer benefits to employees to attract and retain the highest skilled workers in the business. Some popular benefits for electricians include paid sick time, paid vacations, health insurance, 401k plans and education assistance. While self-employed electricians may earn higher salaries, they must pay for their own benefits. A position with a company may become more valuable when salary and benefits are considered.

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About the Author

Luanne Kelchner works out of Daytona Beach, Florida and has been freelance writing full time since 2008. Her ghostwriting work has covered a variety of topics but mainly focuses on health and home improvement articles. Kelchner has a degree from Southern New Hampshire University in English language and literature.

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